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discardedsuit

 

This appears to be a discarded alien uniform from Earth vs The Flying Saucers (1956).  An amazing image I’ve not seen before, and so I thought I would share it with you. A special thanks to Steve Niles for sharing on his Tumblr Page.

Julie Adams meets the Gill-Man

Julie Adams meets the Gill-Man

Great things happen when horror aficionados get together. When horror writer, Steve Niles, befriended make-up artist, William Forsche, via Facebook, they realized they shared a love of classic movie monsters and monster make-up. To cement the relationship, Mr. Forsche sent Mr. Niles three discs with thousands of rare, big reference monster photos from his personal collection. Being an extra generous human being, Mr. Forsche allowed Steve to share these images on his Tumblr page, concisely titled, Steve Niles Tumblr.

Many of these images I’ve rarely seen (occasionally coming across one in a horror forum), and some of them I’ve never seen. Because of the rarity of these photos (covering the gamut of horror films from Lon Chaney in Phantom of the Opera, through the Universal horror classics, to Ridley Scott’s Alien), I thought my readers may be interested in seeing them, too. Steve Niles has been publishing the collection daily, up to the daily Tumblr limit. It’s an absolute wealth of material, and Steve promises he has barely scratched the surface. However, I’ve decided to post some of the shots from The Creature movies (Creature from the Black Lagoon, Revenge of the Creature, and The Creature Walks Among Us) as I have a personal fondness for the Gill-Man, and I know many of you love these films as well.

Now, enough words and onto the pictures:

An assortment of potential Gill-Man masks.

An assortment of potential Gill-Man masks.

First Gill-Man head. A more sleek design - never used.

First Gill-Man head. A more sleek design - never used.

Another view of the first Gill-Man head - never used.

Another view of the first Gill-Man head - never used.

Gill-Man with the original Gill-Man head. Also note the odd split chest piece. Actors Julie Adams and Richard Carlson standing off to the side.

Gill-Man with the original Gill-Man head. Also note the odd split chest piece. Actors Julie Adams and Richard Carlson standing off to the side. Obviously not the towering Ben Chapman (who played the Creature on land) in the suit.

Gill-Man with the now familiar head designed by Milicent Patrick. Still, the odd split chest piece, and Richard Carlson and Julie Adams standing to either side.

The Creature poses near a tree. The classic Gill-Man head, but the unfamiliar split-chested suit.

The Creature poses near a tree. The classic Gill-Man head, but the unfamiliar split-chested suit.

The Creature in all his glory.

The Creature in all his glory.

More Gill-Man glory.

More Gill-Man glory.

The Gill-Man, Julie Adams, and Richard Carlson. I love all three of them!

The Gill-Man, Julie Adams, and Richard Carlson. I love all three of them!

Filming Revenge of the Creature. Ricou Browning portrayed the Creature underwater.

Filming Revenge of the Creature. Ricou Browning portrayed the Creature underwater.

Gorgeous Milicent Patrick, designer of the Creature, clowns around. Ms. Patrick also served as eye dressing in many television programs and feature films.

Gorgeous Milicent Patrick, designer of the Creature, clowns around. Ms. Patrick also served as eye dressing in many television programs and feature films.

That’s it for now, but be sure to check out Steve Niles Tumblr for more images, including images from The Creature Walks Among Us, which I’ve neglected here. Also, give a murmur of gratitude to William Forsche, who allowed Steve to share these images with the world. Lord knows that I appreciate it!

If you’ve wondered where I’ve been as of late, I’ve been visiting Jose and his companion,  Stephen (a talking gorilla) at Mephisto’s Castle. I would have been back sooner, but it’s a large estate, with plenty of rooms. It’s easy to get lost. Jose invited me, and he extends a similar offer to you:

Perhaps you’d like to stay a while and have a look around the place for yourself? Be sure to take the lantern with you. These halls can be quite treacherous at times, and you have no idea who (or what) you might literally run into. We have strange guests who like to pop in at odd hours, but pay no mind to them. Just try not to wander too far from the grounds. The leeches out by the lake grow pretty big and there’s no guarantee that the demon trees won’t try to snatch you away.

While I was there, I shared a little story of my own. Check it out, and then get lost in Mephisto’s Castle yourself. You won’t regret it.

Boris Karloff

The following article was originally published in Films and Filming (London), November 1957 and then reprinted in Castle of Frankenstein #14, 1969. A very special thanks is due to regular reader and commenter, Paul Bollenbacher, for sending me this article in its entirety.

I dislike the word “horror” yet it is a word that has been tagged to me all my life. It is a misnomer…for it means revulsion. The films I have made were made for entertainment, maybe with the object of making the audience’s hair stand on end, but never to revolt people. Perhaps terror would be a much better word to describe these films, but alas, it is too late now to change the adjective. My films even prompted the British Censor to introduce a certificate in the early 30’s known as H…for horror.

Early in 1931 when the first Frankenstein film was released the Universal publicity department coined the phrase “A Horror Picture” and from that day on the “horror film” was here to stay. This genre of film entertainment obviously fulfills a desire in people to experience something, which is beyond the range of everyday human emotion. This conclusion can be drawn from two facts.

First, from the tremendous success financially and otherwise of the early Frankenstein films and subsequent pictures of a similar type. Secondly, because of an incident on the set of Stranglehold, a British “horror” film which I have just finished making at Walton Studios. We were about to shoot a sequence in which a man is fogged. Suddenly the set was crowded by studio workmen and office girls all eager to have a look! There is a violent streak in all of us: and if it can be exploded in the cinema instead of in some antisocial manner in real life, so much the better.

Perhaps the best possible audience for a “horror” film is a child audience. The vivid imagination with which a child is gifted is far more receptive to the ingredients in these pictures than the adult imagination, which merely finds them artificial. Because they have vivid imaginations we must not underestimate children…they know far more than we think they do.

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Tony Rash, my first best friend.Sadly, in addition to the recent deaths of Don Knotts, Dennis Weaver, and Darren McGavin, I have to include a profound personal loss.My boyhood friend, Tony Rash, passed away very suddenly on March 6, 2006. He was only 43 years old. Tony leaves behind a wife, Dianne, and two small children, Megan and Michael.

Tony was my best friend during grammar school and junior high. It is impossible for me to think of my childhood without thinking of him. We shared a love of science fiction and horror movies, and the highlight of our week was always the “weekend stay-over” where we’d stay up late and watch Creature Features with my little brother, Tom.

One of the reasons I started collecting B movies is because watching them reminded me of those wonderful boyhood late nights when Tony and I would try to keep each other awake so we wouldn’t fall asleep before seeing the finale of films like It Came from Outer Space or Creature from the Black Lagoon.

But Tony was far more than a movie-watching partner. We shared many adventures on camp outs and exploratory trips into the woods near my house. We assembled monster models together, shared a love of animals, and discussed a wide range of topics from cartoons, to sex, to God, and everything in-between. Tony literally saved my life once (I fell into a pond and could not swim. I was losing consciousness when Tony pulled me out.) Tony was such a good-humored kid. I could always get him to laugh so hard during school lunches that he would spray milk from his nose. We faced neighborhood bullies together and swore friendship till death do us part.

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